Tasmanian Pipe Dream

In an article in The (Hobart) Mercury Park Beach surfer Mr Hollmer-Cross has called for more research to be undertaken.
themercury.com.au/news/tasmania/surfing-family-has-a-beef-with-reef

“There has been no hydrological or environmental assessments on why that spot has been selected as the optimum spot in Tasmania,” he said.
“The surf is really functional as it is, it always has been. For recreational and learner surfers it’s actually ideal.”

That is one of the rules of building artificial surf reefs:
Put them somewhere that no one surfs – there are miles of coastline that fulfill that requirement.

Shane Abel has spent the past three years working on a proposal for an artificial reef at Park Beach, south-east of Hobart.
Mr Abel has done extensive research on attempts to create artificial surf reefs around the world.

Read about how he intends to construct the “reef” in this article by ABC:
abc.net.au/news/2017-07-12/artificial-surf-reef-proposed-for-tasmania/8698874

plan

Shane Abel on Facebook:
facebook.com/pg/canopy01

Editied from the Facebook page:
The reef is constructed from HDPE, the same material used in fish farm cages. The reef is supported on timber piles and is above the ocean floor and not interfering with the littoral drift or sealife that live in the sea beds.
The Wavebuster HDPE reef surface can be designed to match any world class reef within 20mm. The reef slope can be set at any angle to incoming swell with 45 degrees being the middle ground with increased angle producing faster waves and decreased angles producing slower waves.
Construction of the reef is simple with the piles driven from a barge and the reef fabricated onshore then floated out and sunk into position.
Unlike rock or sandbags the Wavebuster reef can be removed easily if there any issues.

Pushing the sand around to save Palm Beach

Gold Coast City Council (in Queensland, Australia) have a Surf Management Plan that includes:

  • strategies to maximise enjoyment and minimise conflict between beach user groups (e.g. seasonal adjustments to flagged swimming and board riders zones)
  • new coastal capital works projects will give consideration to both coastal protection and where possible, enhancement of surf amenity.

 

Details
goldcoast.qld.gov.au/thegoldcoast/surf-management-plan-23579.html

They announced in June 2016 that $4.5 million has been set aside to start the Palm Beach Shoreline Project and build an artificial reef about 400 metres off Palm Beach. It is expected to take four years.

brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/palm-beach-gets-artificial-reef

gcoast

See also the previous story (July 2015):
brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/gold-coast-beach-erosion-plan

Note that Australian Coastal Walls are selling the ACW Geo-Block beach protection system. More about that on their web page.
australiancoastalwalls.com.au

For a longer term view of Gold Coast coastal management:
goldcoast.qld.gov.au/thegoldcoast/coastal-management-3246.html

 

Collaroy to Narrabeen

Sydney, Australia in the newly formed Northern Beaches Council Area

Following the June 2016 Black NorEaster and/or East Coast Low beach and property suffered significant damage.

Surfrider Foundation Northern Beaches was in the firing line for organising the 2002 Line In The Sand which convinced the then Warringah Council that the community was opposed to the construction of a multimillion dollar seawall over a kilometre long dumping 85,000 tons of rock on the beach at great public expense.

Seawalls profoundly damage beaches and Surfrider remains implacably opposed to hard so-called protective structures on beaches.

See there report to NB Council: makesurf/collaroy_seawall2016.pdf

OR

cloudfront.net/surfrider/pages/../Council_Presentation_Collaroy_Seawall_(1).pdf?1469083587


Northern Beaches surfrider.org.au/nsw

The Northern Beaches Branch was one of Surfrider Australia’s original branches and is still going strong 20 years on!

Major campaigns over its life include the upgrade of Warriewood Sewage Treatment Plant, protesting the proposed seawall for Collaroy/Narrabeen Beach 2002 with the famous “Line In The Sand” and thwarting the proposed overdevelopment of Long Reef SLSC on 2 separate occasions.

The branch has representation on council committees and work closely with environment centres in Manly and Pittwater.

Always looking for another face and bod to lend a hand so if you live anywhere around the Northern Beaches contact them from details on the page:
surfrider.org.au/nsw

Podcast: Discovery

How to Make an Awesome Surf Wave
bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03670q5
from the BBC. (27 minutes)

Discusses engineering to make more and better surf breaks.
Discusses Boscombe, Bournemouth then to the Basque Country in northern Spain to the Wavegarden, in the foothills of the Cantabrian mountains.
Surfing veterans share their thoughts with marine biologist Helen Scales.

bbc.in/1Phlhit

Troy Bottegal and the bubble bank

Under headlines of world’s first inflatable artificial reef, a concept has been heralded that uses sand anchors to install an inflatable sail-like structure “the size of a large roundabout” offshore.

Troy Bottegal believes that where the ocean meets the submerged sail, the result will be a steady supply of surfer-friendly waves.

He is probably right but the Kickstarter project’s funding goal was not reached on November 24, 2014.
I am scanning this search for someone that has made calculations on the physics of the forces involved:

Bottegal

Click the link for an updated search – from SurfingSites.net
http://bit.ly/Troy_Bottegal

Posted in artificial surf | Comments Off on Troy Bottegal and the bubble bank

A Closer Look at Artificial Waves

Faking it – an article by Matt Clark addresses the questions:

  • So How Do Wave Generators Work?
  • Are They Sustainable?
  • Bringing Surf Culture Inland?
  • Where and When Can I Try It?
  • If a surf park came to your hometown, will you rush to try it?

magicseaweed.com/news/faking-it-a-closer-look-at-artificial-waves

waveloch1

The Masterplan of the Wavegraden site at Bristol, UK
© 2015 – Wavegarden

Wave Loch
youtube.com/watch?v=-zmuvP_dxAA
and
vimeo.com/112612722

Mount Maunganui Reef

Finally gone according to this SunLive NZ article
sunlive.co.nz/news/86837-time-called-on-artificial-reef.html
In September 2014 it was going and Underwater Solutions were taking it:
nzherald.co.nz/bay-of-plenty-times/news

Here is the talk in April 2014 about removing the artificial reef affectionately known as “Mt Reef” .

NZ radio interview:
newstalkzb.co.nz/auckland/listen-on-demand/audio/913189242-eddie-grogan–artificial-reef-removal

Dredging today:
dredgingtoday.com/2014/04/17/new-zealand-officials-plan-to-remove-mount-maunganui-reef

NZ Herald:
nzherald.co.nz/bay-of-plenty-times/news

See this page (2009) for background information:
estradaphoto.wordpress.com/2009/06/11/the-truth-about-the-mount-reef

I can’t see how one relatively small construction can make a decent surf break when the best breaks have the right shapes underwater in many directions.

Any comment on “local lifeguards complaining“?